Category Archives: Past Programs

Tick Check – A Program on Human Insect-Borne Diseases Audio Recording

DeerVersusDogTickHirundo Wildlife Refuge Old Town/Alton and Penobscot Valley Chapter of Small Woodland Owners Association of Maine are offering “Tick Check”, a program on human insect-borne diseases on Saturday, April 5, 2014 10 AM – Noon at the Maine Forest Service Central Region Headquarters in Old Town, Maine. Many of us who spend time in the outdoors have noticed an increase in the number of ticks in our region. At the same time, we have heard numerous reports about increasing cases of Lyme disease and other insect-borne diseases. This program provides an opportunity to learn current information that will help to better enjoy the outdoors and our woods. The program will include a review of tick and mosquito-borne diseases that are of concern in Maine, a demonstration of tick identification and a discussion of methods for disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Presenters will include:
Sara Robinson, Insect-Vector Epidemiologist at Maine Center for Disease Control; Jim Dill Entomologist at University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Craig Curtis, MD Family Medicine.

Deer Ticks
Synopsis by Ryan Robbins

Adult Female
Intro-Jim-Dill, Entomologist at UMaine Cooperative Extension

Adult Female Engorged
Tick Identification-Clay Kirby, Associate Scientist, Entomology at UMaine Cooperative Extension
Nymph & Adult
American Dog Ticks
Tick and Mosquito Biology-Griffin Dill, Scientific Technician at UMaine Cooperative Extension
Adult Female
Tick and Mosquito-borne Diseases-Sara Robinson, Insect-Vector Epidemiologist at Maine Center for Disease Control Adult Male
Medical Treatment of Insect-borne Diseases-Craig Curtis, MD Family Medicine
Nymph

Audio Credit: Ryan Robbins, Bangor City Forest Report
Pictures Credit: UMaine Cooperative Extension

Posted in News, Past Programs

TICK CHECK! – A Program on Human Insect-Borne Diseases

PENOBSCOT VALLEY CHAPTER SMALL WOODLAND OWNERS ASSOCIATION OF MAINE and HIRUNDO WILDLIFE REFUGE present:

Saturday, April 5, 2014 10 AM – Noon

 Maine Forest Service Central Region Headquarters Old Town, Maine

Many of us who spend time in the outdoors have noticed an increase in the number of ticks in our region. At the same time, we have heard numerous reports about increasing cases of Lyme disease and other insect-borne diseases. This program provides an opportunity to learn current information that will help to better enjoy the outdoors and our woods. The program will include a review of tick and mosquito-borne diseases that are of concern in Maine, a demonstration of tick identification and a discussion of methods for disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Presenters will include:

Sara Robinson
Insect-Vector Epidemiologist
Maine Center for Disease Control

Jim Dill
Entomologist
University of Maine Cooperative Extension

Primary Healthcare Provider
To Be Announced

Directions: Take Route I-95 North or South to Old Town exit 197. Travel in easterly direction toward Old Town. Turn left at the DeWitt Airfield entrance. Turn right at the sign for the Maine Forest Service.

Registration is encouraged by April 1, 2014. Please respond by e-mail to Larry Beauregard, Penobscot Valley Chapter Leader, at redspruce@myfairpoint.net

Winter Family Day

 Sunday, March 9  12 – 3 p.m.                                

Hirundo Wildlife Refuge’s first Winter Family Day offers a great line-up of programs and activities for all ages and abilities.

  • Survival Adaptations of Animals in Winter
  • Pond life in Winter
  • Hirundo Biathlon
  • Animal Sculpture Competition
  • Campfire, hot chocolate and s’mores
  • Self-guided activities

We will present two environmental programs. “Survival Adaptations of Animals in Winter” introduces you to the amazing ways of how animals cope with the cold. Your skill of observation is put to the test when “Searching for Signs of Animals” during the guided trail walk. Hirundo’s Biathlon measures speed, as well as agility in a snowshoe race, and precision by throwing snowballs at a target.

Snowshoe race. From Canadian Archives
Snowshoe race. From Canadian Archives

Tired? Take a break by the campfire; warm up with hot chocolate and s’mores. Better yet, plan to spend the day. Pack a lunch and enjoy it next to the fireplace inside the shelter. We invite everyone to participate in the animal snow sculpture competition to gain local fame. If you prefer to be on your own, check out our Self-guided activities.

3.9.14-Schedule-Winter Family Fun Day

No matter which activity you choose – it will be fun.

Bring your own ski or rent from Maine Bound Equipment Rentals

“Song in the Woods” Dogsled Adventures will be back in 2015 !

OWL Walk

Wednesday, February 26 & March 5, 2014 at 6 p.m.                                       OWL Walk

 Little Owl shows how it's done. Photographed by Austin Thomas/Solent
Little Owl shows how it’s done. Photographed by Austin Thomas/Solent

presented by local bird guide, Paul Markson. Before the walk in the dark forest Paul will explain what makes owls such extraordinary hunters and introduces the species that we encounter in Maine. After a brief training session in identifying different owl calls we will go for hike (maximum distance 1 mile) practicing the newly learned skill.  The  introduction is inside the Parker Reed shelter.  Bring flashlight and dress for the weather. Depending on weather, conditions bring snowshoes or reserve a pair with us.

For reservation and possible cancellation call 207-944-9259 or visit www.hirundomaine.org

Program is open to all ages, recommendation is 8 years and above. Suggested donation is $5 for adults, school-aged children are free.

 

Valentine’s Day Full Moon Guided Hike

Friday Feb 14, 2014 6.30 p.m

                           

Under the Valentine's Moon
Under the Valentine’s Moon

Looking for a unique experience on Valentine’s Day?

We hiked along the Big Spring Trail and make our way through the snow through the open field of the Thornplum Trail, and we saw the moon.

 

“Three Restoration Projects in Maine: Eagles, Rivers and Chestnuts”

Friday, February 7, 2014 at 7 p.m. - 

     In this exciting talk Bucky Owen will cover the amazing recovery of American Bald Eagles, the status of the restoration of the Penobscot River and 11 species of migratory fish, and, finally, the latest word on the recovery of the American Chestnut, once the most important tree in our eastern forests.

American chestnut by Doug Jacobs
American chestnut by Doug Jacobs

Old Town Elementary School fifth grade students will join Mr. Owen, to speak about their experience at the Student’s Environmental Monitoring Project at Hirundo Wildlife Refuge last fall. During this project, nearly 100 students spent the day at the Refuge gathering data on freshwater mussel species.

The event is co-sponsored by Old Town Museum and Hirundo Wildlife Refuge. It will take place at the museum located at 353 Main St. (Route 2) in Old Town. 

 

 

Groundhog Day – what did Penobscot Phyllis see?

Sunday, Feb 2, 2014 at 1 p.m 
Will the woodchuck be out?
Will the woodchuck be out?

Will the groundhog have emerged from its hibernation? Let’s find out!

We will search for signs of Hirundo’s resident groundhog, a good way to hone observational and tracking skills. An introduction to this and other members of the rodent family found at the refuge will be held at the Parker Reed shelter prior to the walk. Topics include habitats and habits (seasonal survival strategies).

Meet at Parker Reed shelter accessible through Gate 1 of Rt. 43.  Reservations and cancellations requested by February 1, 2014,  call 207-944-9259.  Suggested donations are $5 for adults, school-aged children are free.

-The legend of Groundhog Day is based on an old Scottish couplet:
                 “If Candlemas Day is bright and clear,
there’ll be two winters in the year.”

Info from http://www.gojp.com/groundhog/ maintained by Jason Patton

What we saw

We saw many things on groundhog day except  Penobscot Phyllis,  the Refuge’s resident groundhog and the world’s only female groundhog prognosticator! She missed out on the lack of sunshine, the light fog rising over the field and our discoveries:  the fox den, a new deer rub along the Thornplum Trail, some green blades of grass, several birds nest made visible by tufts of snow and numerous deer trails.

Our prognoses: We have a week of cold weather ahead and are heading into spring. We already gained an hour of daylight since the winter solstice. All in all, things are looking up!

Penobscot Phyllis' stand in

Penobscot Phyllis’ stand in

 

Reading the Forested Landscape

Sunday, December 8 at 1 PM

Did you ever wonder about the historic use of your land? The forest offers tell-tale signs for those who know how to interpret them.

Join Larry Beauregard on his walk through the Refuge and learn to read the landscape. Larry’s presentation

Lightning Strike

Lightning Strike

focuses on forest succession and how various disturbances, natural and man-made, influence the forest that we see around us. Meet at the Parker Reed shelter, accessible by Gate 1.

Reservation requested by 11.9. 2013, call 944-9259. Suggested donation $5 per adult, school-aged children are free.

Larry Beauregard is a retired geneticist who is now pursuing his interest in learning about the forests of Maine. He serves as a volunteer at Hirundo Wildlife Refuge and as a mentor in the Maine Master Naturalist Program.  He is the Penobscot Valley Chapter Leader for the Small Woodland Association of Maine and is currently a student in the University of Maine School of Forest Resources.

 

Mushroom Walk

Mushroom Walk – Saturday, October 19 at 1 PM

Fourteen fungi enthusiast searched, knelt and exclaimed when finding the colourful fruiting bodies of many fungi species.

Among our discoveries were several species of bracket fungi including tinder and birch bark fungus both of which were found with Ötzi, the 5300 year old iceman, discovered in the alps in 1991 http://www.iceman.it/en/node/233 . We also found gilled mushrooms (order agaricales), boletes those with a spongy surface of pores, jelly fungi in black, yellow and red, and a peculiar looking pinkish-white slime mold. Seanna Annis gave insight to the complex sex life of fungi, their ecology and uses. Yes, some mushrooms are edible, have medicinal value and they are also used for dying fibers, producing beautiful warm colours.  If you missed this year’s walk be sure to join us next fall for our Annual Foray with State mycologist Seanna Annis.

 

 

 

 

Full Moon Paddle

Full Moon Paddle – Friday, October 18 at 5:30 PM

Evening falls at Pushaw Stream
Evening falls at Pushaw Stream

It was the last full Moon Paddle of the season!

A dozen participants enjoyed an unforgettable October paddle. The Hunter Moon rose majestically lighting our path along Pushaw Stream. Beavers crossing in front of us was the second highlight during the evening excursion. We all sat quietly hoping for another encounter. It was a beautiful image, five canoes drifting on dark water, illuminated by a bright moon and enveloped by the sounds of the night will be etched into my mind.